Faculty Profile, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan

Faculty Profiles


Ing-Ming Chiu, Ph.D.

Distinguished Investigator and Director
Institute of Cellular and Systems Medicine
ingming@nhri.org.tw

EDUCATION

Ph.D., Chemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA, 1981
B.S., Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 1974

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES

Professor Chiu's research interests are in the areas of
  • role of fibroblast growth factors in development and human diseases;
  • transcriptional regulation of FGF1 gene expression; and
  • therapeutic application and basic biology of neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells in neural degenerative disorders and traumatized nervous systems.

    RESEARCH INTERESTS

    Dr. Chiu and his team have generated F1B-Tag transgenic mice in which promoter 1B of fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) gene dictates the brain-specific expression of SV40 T antigen. With a complete penetrance, the mice developed brain tumors that originated in the ventricles, hippocampus and olfactory bulb. These are the areas known to be abundant for neural stem cells and neural progenitors. They further showed that F1B-Tag tumor cells are multipotent neural stem cells capable of differentiating into all three neural progeny lineages. Prompted by this observation, they have established a patented technology in which mouse neural stem cells could be isolated from adult mouse brain when transfected with F1B-GFP plasmid in which GFP (green fluorescent protein) is driven by the human FGF1 promoter. In addition, they showed that mouse neural stem cells thus isolated, based on GFP expression, could repair the severed rat sciatic nerve and allow the paraplegic rats to use their crippled hind legs again after one week. They will test if the same F1B-GFP plasmid could be used to identify and enrich human neural stem cells from human brains and other tissues. They are also interested in characterizing the capacities of other factors such as Nestin, Sox1, Sox2 and Oct4 in defining neural stem cells. Finally, they are interested in characterizing the transcriptional machinery that regulates the FGF1 gene expression in neural stem cells. Understanding the mechanism of sustaining neural stem cells will facilitate the future application of neural stem cells in cell-based therapies for stroke, spinal cord injuries, and neurodegenerative diseases.

    RESEARCH ACTIVITIES & ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    Dr. Chiu and his team have generated F1B-Tag transgenic mice in which promoter 1B of fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) gene dictates the brain-specific expression of SV40 T antigen. With a complete penetrance, the mice developed brain tumors that originated in the ventricles, hippocampus and olfactory bulb. These are the areas known to be abundant for neural stem cells and neural progenitors. They further showed that F1B-Tag tumor cells are multipotent neural stem cells capable of differentiating into all three neural progeny lineages. Prompted by this observation, they have established a patented technology in which mouse neural stem cells could be isolated from adult mouse brain when transfected with F1B-GFP plasmid in which GFP (green fluorescent protein) is driven by the human FGF1 promoter. In addition, they showed that mouse neural stem cells thus isolated, based on GFP expression, could repair the severed rat sciatic nerve and allow the paraplegic rats to use their crippled hind legs again after one week. They will test if the same F1B-GFP plasmid could be used to identify and enrich human neural stem cells from human brains and other tissues. They are also interested in characterizing the capacities of other factors such as Nestin, Sox1, Sox2 and Oct4 in defining neural stem cells. Finally, they are interested in characterizing the transcriptional machinery that regulates the FGF1 gene expression in neural stem cells. Understanding the mechanism of sustaining neural stem cells will facilitate the future application of neural stem cells in cell-based therapies for stroke, spinal cord injuries, and neurodegenerative diseases.

    HONORS & AWARDS

  • President, Taiwanese Bioscientists of America (2005-2006)
  • Outstanding Researcher of the Year, Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, USA (2002)
  • Member, Scientific Review Committee, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan (1998-2005)
  • Member, Cell Biology and Physiology Study Section, National Institutes of Health, USA (1994-1998)
  • Research Career Development Award, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, USA (1990-1995)
  • Faculty Research Award, American Cancer Society, USA (1990-1995, declined)
  • Ohio Cancer Research Award, The Ohio State University, USA (1988-1990)
  • Research Challenge Award, The Ohio State University, USA (1986)
  • Fogarty International Fellowship, National Institutes of Health, USA (1981-1984)

    SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • Hsu SH, Su CH and Chiu IM*. A novel approach to align adult neural stem cells on micropatterned conduits for peripheral nerve regeneration: a feasibility study. Artificial Organs. (in press)
  • Hsu YC, Lee YC and Chiu IM*. Neural stem cells, neural progenitors and neuotrophic factors. Cell Transplant, 16:133-150, 2007. (*=Corresponding Author)
  • Yen ML, Chien CC, Chiu IM, Huang HI, Chen YC, Hu HI and Yen BL. Multilineage differentiation and characterization of the human fetal osteoblastic 1.19 cell line: a possible in vitro model of human mesenchymal progenitors. Stem Cells, 25:125-131, 2007.
  • Hung KW, Kumar TK, Kathir KM, Xu P, Ni F, Ji HH, Chen MC, Yang CC, Lin FP, Chiu IM* and Yu C. Solution Structure of the Ligand Binding Domain of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor - Role of Heparin in the Activation of the Receptor. Biochemistry, 44: 15787-15798, 2005. (*=Corresponding Author)
  • Hsiue GH, Sung HW, Hsu SH, Huang LLH, Lin FH, Tsai RJF and Chiu IM*. Current research activity in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in Taiwan. Regenerative Med, 4:100-105, 2005. (*=Corresponding Author)
  • Martineau Y, Le BC, Monbrun L, Allo V, Chiu IM, Danos O, Moine H, Prats H and Prats AC. Internal ribosome entry site structural motifs conserved among mammalian fibroblast growth factor 1 alternatively spliced mRNAs. Mol. Cell. Biol, 24: 7622-7635, 2004.
  • Liu YP, Burleigh D, Durning M, Hudson L, Chiu IM* and Golos TG. Id2 is a primary partner for the E2-2 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor in the human placenta. Mol. Cell. Endocrinol, 222: 83-91, 2004. (*=Corresponding Author)
  • Hung KW, Kumar TK, Chi YH, Chiu IM* and Yu C. Molecular cloning, overexpression, and characterization of the ligand-binding D2 domain of fibroblast growth factor receptor. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun, 317: 253-258, 2004. (*=Corresponding Author)

    PATENT

  • U.S. Patent Application No. 11/375,889, divisional application of “Transgenic Animal For Screening Therapeutic Agents For Brain Tumors”; filed on March 15, 2006
  • US Patent No. 7,045,678 “Transgenic mouse For Screening Therapeutic Agents For Brain Tumors”; Granted May 15, 2006
  • US Patent No. 6,984,518 “DNA Construct Comprising An FGF1B Promoter Region Operably Linked To An SV40 Large T Antigen Encoding Sequence”, Granted January 10, 2006
  • US Patent no. 5,925,528 “ Murine Cell Lines Which Over Produce Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor (AFGF) And Method of Using Same” ; Granted July 20, 1999
  • US Patent no. 5,750,365 “ Isolated Nucleic Acid Encoding A New Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor (AFGF)”; Granted May 12, 1998