Faculty Profile, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan

Faculty Profiles


Ching-Chuan Kuo, Ph.D.

Assistant Investigator
National Institute of Cancer Research
cckuo@nhri.org.tw

EDUCATION

Ph.D., Graduate Institute of Food Science and Technology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 2001

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES

  • Assistant Investigator, National Institute of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Taipei, Taiwan (2007~present)

  • Research Associate, National Institute of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Taipei, Taiwan (2004~2007)

  • Post Doctoral Fellow, Division of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Taipei, Taiwan (2001~2004)

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Dr. Kuo's research interests are mainly on chemoprevention, redox biology, and preclinical pharmacology & experimental molecular therapeutics on cancer research. Currently, Dr. Kuo's laboratory is working on the pharmacology of tubulin targeted drugs, mechanism of action of Nrf2 modulators, novel drug combination strategies, and mechanisms and reversal of drug resistance. In collaboration with other investigators, Dr. Kuo's laboratory is also working on the modulation of DNA repair protein MGMT on cancer therapy, and identifying anti-angiogenic/ anti-metastatic components from natural occurring substances and synthetic compounds.

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES & ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Dr. Kuo’s work has been divided to two directions: first is to discover the novel microtubule inhibitors as potential anti-cancer drugs, and second is to investigate the modulation of DNA repair protein MGMT on cancer therapy. In first part, Dr. Kuo has addressed the mechanism of action of a novel synthetic indole compound BPR0L075, and found this chemical is a promising anticancer compound with antimitotic activity that has potential for management of various malignancies, particularly for patients with drug resistance. In the study of MGMT modulation, Dr. Kuo provided evidence that MGMT plays a role in determining camptothecin cytotoxicity. The effect of MGMT on camptothecin cytotoxicity may arise through the modulation of protein-linked DNA breaks production. This result may have a relevance to clinical use of camptothecin and significance in clinical cancer research. Besides, Dr. Kuo also showed tamoxifen, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is able to decrease the MGMT level in cancer cells by accelerating protein degradation through the ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal pathway. Tamoxifen at a serum concentration that is clinically achievable can enhance the cytotoxicity of BCNU toward cancer cells. These findings provide a rationale for clinical trials in human malignancies with tamoxifen to increase the therapeutic response to BCNU.

HONORS & AWARDS


  1. Award of the Best Research Project. The 12th Joint Congress of Oncology Societies of Taiwan, Taiwan, 2007.

  2. Award of the Best Research Project. The 8th Joint Congress of Oncology Societies of Taiwan, Taiwan, 2003.

  3. Research Paper Competition Award. Chinese Institute of Food Science and Technology, Taiwan, 2000.

  4. Ph.D. Student Academic Scholarship. Foundation of Chinese Dietary Culture, Taiwan, 1998.

  5. Outstanding Research Award for Excellence in Chinese Medicine Research. National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taiwan, 1998.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS


  1. Kuo CC, Liu JF, Shiah HS, Ma LC and Chang JY*. Tamoxifen accelerate proteasomal degradation of O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase in human cancer cells. International Journal of Cancer, 121(10):2293-2300, 2007. (SCI; Category: Oncology; I.F.: 4.693; Ranking: 27/127, 21.3%, 2006 JCR)

  2. Liou JP, HsuKS, Kuo CC, Chang CY and Chang JY*. A novel oral indoline-sulfonamide agent, N-[1-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)- 2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-7-yl]- isonicotinamide (J30), exhibits potent activity against human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo through the disruption of microtubule. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 323(1):398-405, 2007. (SCI; Category: Pharmacology & Pharmacy; I.F.: 3.956; Ranking: 35/199, 17.6%, 2006 JCR)

  3. Kuo CC, Liu JF and Chang JY*. DNA repair enzyme, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase, modulates cytotoxicity of camptothecin-derived topoisomerase I inhibitors. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 316(2):946-954, 2006. (SCI; Category: Pharmacology & Pharmacy; I.F.: 3.956; Ranking: 35/199, 17.6%, 2006 JCR)

  4. Kuo CC, Hsieh HP, Pan WY, Chen CP, Liou JP, Lee SJ, Chang YL, Chen LT, Chen CT* and Chang JY*. BPR0L075, a novel synthetic indole compound with antimitotic activity in human cancer cells, exerts effective antitumoral activity in vivo. Cancer Research, 1; 64(13):4621-4628, 2004. (SCI; Category: Oncology; I.F.: 7.656; Ranking: 10/127, 7.9%, 2006 JCR)

  5. Juang SH, Pan WY, Kuo CC, Liou JP, Hung YM, Chen LT, Hsieh HP and Chang JY*. A novel bis-benzylidenecyclopentanone derivative, BPR0Y007, inducing a rapid caspase activation involving upregulation of Fas (CD95/APO-1) and wild-type p53 in human oral epidermoid carcinoma cells. Biochemical Pharmacology, 68(2):293-303, 2004. (SCI; Category: Pharmacology & Pharmacy; I.F.: 3.581; Ranking: 45/199, 22.6%, 2006 JCR)

  6. Chang JY*, Chang CY, Kuo CC, Chen LT, Wein WS and Kuo YH. Salvinal, a novel microtubule inhibitor isolated from Salvia miltiorrhizae Bunge (Danshen), with antimitotic activity in multidrug-sensitive and –resistant human tumor cells. Molecular Pharmacology, 65(1):77-84, 2004. (SCI; Category: Pharmacology & Pharmacy; I.F.: 4.469; Ranking: 26/199, 13.1%, 2006 JCR)

  7. Kuo CC, Chiang W, Liu GP, Chien YL, Chang JY, Lee CK, Lo JM, Huang SL, Shih MC and Kuo YH*. 2,2¢-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl Radical-Scavenging Active Components from Adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf)) Hulls. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 50(21):5850-5855, 2002. (SCI; Category: Food Science & Technology; I.F.: 2.322; Ranking: 8/96, 8.3%, 2006 JCR)